MEMORANDUM FOR CORRESPONDENTS: ANALYSIS OF THE 1976 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING SETTLEMENTS IN THE TRUCKING

by Jack A. Meyer on September 24, 1976
by Jack A. Meyer, Robert W. Crandall, Sean Sullivan and William Lilley

TO THE MEMBERS AND ADVISER MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL ON WAGE AND PRICE STABILITY

The Council on Wage and Price Stability has a statutory mandate to “improve wage and price data bases for the various sectors of the economy to improve collective bargaining and encourage price restraint” and to “work with labor and management in the various sectors of the economy having special economic problems, as well as with the appropriate government agencies, to improve the structure of collective bargaining and the performance of those sectors in restraining prices.” In furtherance of this mandate the Council prepared a background paper on major 1976 collective bargaining negotiations which was published in January 1976. Subsequently, the Council decided to analyze the important collective bargaining settlements individually. The Council staff has prepared reports describing and
assessing the impact of agreements in the trucking, electrical equipment, and rubber industries, and these three documents are presented here together.

It is worth noting that while each of the three settlements discussed in this report includes features which concern the Council, wage settlements for the nation as a whole in 1976 have been relatively moderate. In the first six months of 1976 first-year wage increases for workers in collective bargaining units of 1,000 or more workers averaged 8.4 percent, as compared to 10.2 percent in 1975. Over the life of the contract, wage increases among this group averaged 6.8 percent in the first half of 1976, as opposed to 7.8 percent in 1975. Among workers in bargaining units of 5,000 or
more workers, first-year wage and benefit increases averaged 8.9 percent in the first half of 1976, in contrast to 11.4 percent in 1975. The corresponding figures over the life of the agreements are 7.0 percent and 8.0 percent.

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